Sunday, December 10, 2017

FAQ: Paul Nungesser and Emma Sulkowicz, aka "Mattress Girl"

The Nungesser Filed Complaint includes Facebook messages that Sulkowicz agrees are accurate. Her charge against him is that they initiated consensual sex, but then he choked her and anally raped her. Their messages before they had sex do not explain why he might have thought she would want to be choked, a form of "rough sex" or "breath play" that some people enjoy, but they do explain why he might have thought she had consented to anal sex:
Emma: Fuck me in the butt
Paul: ehm
maybe not?
jk
I miss your face tho
Emma: hahahah
you don't miss my lopsided ass?
Paul: I do.
just not that much
good I am actually too tired to choose a movie
*god
also too tired to spell apparently
ETA: The complaint also notes facts about his other accusers:
38. In an effort to bolster her ease, and driven by her feelings of rejection and interest in making a public impact and statement, Emma approached several women with whom she was friendly, encouraging them to each report Paul to the University for sexual misconduct. Two women acquiesced.

39. The first, Jane Doe #1, who was also a member of ADP, filed her complaint against Paul at the end of April or early May 2013, shortly before her graduation. Jane Doe #1 erroneously and wrongfully alleged that a full year prior to her filing (i.e. during the end of her junior year, which was the end of Paul’s freshman year), Paul had grabbed her at a party and tried to kiss her. This allegation was sheer fabrication. Columbia agreed with Paul, ultimately finding him not responsible for the alleged non-consensual sexual contact.*

* Jane Doe #1 later stated, "I wasn’t emotionally scarred or anything. I’m used to people grabbing my ass in bars that’s the shifty state of the world today. Honestly, I didn’t even think it was a reportable offense covered by the misconduct policy." See http.//bwog. com/2Ol4/Ol/23/accessiblepromppt_andequjrab/eanexamjnatjonofsexual
assault-at-columbia/ (Bwog, Jan. 23, 2014)

40. Jane Doe #2, who had been Paul’s girlfriend for several months while they were both freshman (prior to Paul’s sexual intercourse with Emma), was also enticed to file a false report against Paul, alleging sexual misconduct. Jane Doe #2 reported that she had the impression while Paul was her boyfriend, that she could only see him if she had sex with him, and thus she felt obligated to have sex with him. She never alleged physical coercion, violence, or rape. She filed her complaint at the same time as Jane Doe #1. Columbia found a lack of sufficient information to indicate that reasonable suspicion exists of any alleged intimate partner violence and thus terminated Jane Doe # 2’s investigation without any need for a hearing
Recommended: Columbia University rape controversy - Wikipedia

Did ‘Mattress Girl’ Tell the Truth?  Not Very Likely | Minding The Campus

Discredited, the Legend of Mattress Girl Just Won't Go Away - Reason.com 

Saturday, November 4, 2017

How whiteness studies are made meaningless

"The study of whiteness has its origins in a rich scholarly tradition that includes the work of W.E.B. Du Bois, Theodore Allen, Noel Ignatiev, and David Roediger. These writers all explore, in great detail, the intricately imbricated relationship between whiteness and labor in the U.S. But by the time it reaches most of our classrooms and almost all anti-racist training, it has been cleansed of its politics, history and class consciousness and devolved into a privilege walk or a list in Peggy McIntosh’s knapsack. ... Pointing in the abstract toward White privilege shorn from its origins in labor history tends to lead White listeners from the privileged economic classes to unproductive guilt and smug lectures directed toward other, less enlightened White people." —Bill Lyne

from The Ways of White Folks: A Love Letter to the National Education Association

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Identitarian excess: Dick Gregory has to defend his book from students

Dick Gregory writes to student protesters about which battles matter most (essay):
Recently, the young brothers and sisters of MRC Student Coalition at Matteo Ricci College, Seattle University, have taken up such a fight based on curriculum concerns. This protest, however, has become personal for me, since it is in part centered on my autobiography entitled Nigger, and the fact that some students became offended when Jodi Kelly, dean of Matteo Ricci College, recommended Nigger to a student to read.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Doxing Fail: Amateur Sleuths Aim to Identify Charlottesville Marchers, but Sometimes Misfire - The New York Times

Amateur Sleuths Aim to Identify Charlottesville Marchers, but Sometimes Misfire - The New York Times: "A man at the rally had been photographed wearing an “Arkansas Engineering” shirt, and the amateur investigators found a photo of Mr. Quinn that looked somewhat similar. They were both bearded and had similar builds. By internet frenzy standards, that was proof enough."

Monday, August 7, 2017

When video exonerates men of rape

Security video outside nightclub clears USC student of rape - CBS News

There have been several cases like this one, of men who were charged with rape who were exonerated by video that showed the women gave enthusiastic consent by every objective measure. This does not mean the women were liars—there's no reason to assume they did not honestly remember what they said they forgot.

But it does mean "believe the victim" is a bad principle. The better one is "investigate every charge."

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Excellent historical overview: The Panthers Can't Save Us Now

The Panthers Can't Save Us Now:
When confronted with the figure of the white convict, Alexander has argued that he is in fact “collateral damage,” the unintended victim in what is a fundamentally anti-black War on Drugs. Even when presented with the contradiction between the Jim Crow analogy and the class dynamics of incarceration, Alexander doubles down and seems to think that referring to nonblack prisoners as collateral damage is still a politically useful approach. “When a white kid in rural Nebraska gets a prison sentence rather than drug treatment he needs but cannot afford, he’s suffering because of a drug war declared with Black folks in mind,” Alexander contends. “And by describing white people as collateral damage in the drug war it creates an opportunity for us to see the ways in which people of all colors can be harmed by race-based initiatives or attacks that are aimed at another racially defined group.”30 This is a terrible evasion, an attempt to cling to an ideological faith even when actual social conditions require a different approach. The prison expansion and the turn to militaristic hyper-policing are not motivated principally by racism. Whether in Chicago’s North Lawndale neighborhood or the Ozark country of southern Missouri, the process of policing the poor is orchestrated by the same diverse cast of beat cops, case managers, probation officers, district attorneys, public defenders, prison guards and wardens, social reformers, conservative and liberal politicians, weapons manufacturers, lobbyists, nonprofits, and foundations: a kind of social control complex that has been growing by leaps and bounds as poverty, cynicism, and the surplus population increase and the neoliberal era grinds on.
Read it all.

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Kenan Malik on the origins of identity politics

NOT ALL POLITICS IS IDENTITY POLITICS | Pandaemonium:
The origins of identity politics in the late eighteenth century lie with the reactionary right. The original politics of identity was racism and nationalism, and it developed out of the counter-Enlightenment. These early critics of the Enlightenment opposed the idea of universal human values by stressing particularist values embodied in group identities. ‘There is no such thing as Man’, wrote the French arch-reactionary Joseph de Maistre in his polemic against the concept of the Rights of Man. ‘I have seen Frenchmen, Italians and Russians… As for Man, I have never come across him anywhere.’
This is why I sometimes refer to left identitarianism and right identitarianism.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Telling Students ‘Speech is Violence’ Could Be Dangerous

Telling Students ‘Speech is Violence’ Could Be Dangerous:
Setting aside the fact that no one will ever be able to agree on what’s “abusive” versus what’s “merely offensive,” the articles Barrett links to are mostly about chronic stress — the stress elicited by, for example, spending one’s childhood in an impoverished environment of serious neglect and violence. Growing up in a dangerous neighborhood with a poor single mother who has to work so much she doesn’t have time to nurture you is not the same as being a college student at a campus where Yiannopoulos is coming to speak, and where you are free to ignore him or to protest his presence there.